A Field Guide to Microbiology: Recognizing Bacteria In Your Environment

Ever get that creeping feeling that you’re never alone, but instead surrounded by trillions of your closest microbial friends? If so, your intuition is right! Microbes are all around us, and even on and in us. But you don’t have to be a microbiologist to appreciate their diversity and ubiquity – many cultures can be identified using macro-scale features. This week, HiveBio will teach you how to identify key players in your microbial daily life – from what is in your beer on Friday afternoon, to what’s making you stink after a soccer game, to the weird green slime on the pier in Elliot Bay. So join us to get acquainted with the smallest members of our community: bacteria!  Join us for our discussion at Ada’s Technical Books (425 15th Ave on the Hill) at 7:30, Wed 6. Jan.

Class reschedule: Neurophysiology training course Mar. 12th 2016

Calling all aspiring neurophysiologists  – HiveBio is offering a unique, brand new workshop with opportunities to earn credit from the American Council on Education (ACE).This all-day workshop is targeted to intraoperative monitoring professionals as full participants for 6.25 hours of approved ACE credits in neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring. Through lectures, brain dissections, and hands-on techniques in brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), attendees will learn the essence of advanced surgical procedures and neurophysiology. Full participants working towards accreditation will receive a tuning fork for clinical examination, sheep brain for dissection, and tubing for BAEP testing. Additional attendees may observe the workshop. All participants will be provided with a small breakfast and lunch, included in the workshop fee.

Come join HiveBio and otolaryngologist, Daniel M Zeitler, MD, (Virginia Mason Hospital) and Kenneth A Klettke, CNIM, Specialty Care as they develop your understanding of auditory systems, neurophysiology, and surgical techniques.

This class is now being offered on Mar 12, 2016.

Full participants limited to 8, public observers limited to 4.

NeuroPhysiology Workshop2

 

 

The Mystery of the Motor: Origin, Evolution, and Ecology of Bacterial Swimming

Swimming is a widespread strategy of many bacteria of vastly different lineages, and flagellar motility (swimming by means of a whip-like appendage) produces impressive results. Motile bacteria have distinct advantages over others in their environment – including antibiotic resistance, strategies against predation and viral lysis, and ability to respond to gradients. This comes at a metabolic cost, however, and is the reason behind a highly complex and step-dependent genetic assembly pathway. More intriguing – many bacteria have nearly identical and highly complex motors. How did such a complex machine come to be located in an otherwise simple organism? What secrets of evolution, ecology, and the origins of life can bacterial motility unlock?

Join us in a discussion of bacterial motility, with a focus on marine systems, led by UW graduate student Max Showalter as we talk about the mystery of the motor. Meet us at Ada’s Technical Books (425 15th Ave. E), this Wednesday, Dec 2nd at 7:30 PM.

New class – earn credits in neurophysiology

** NOTE: This class is in the process of being rescheduled for a later date, and will not take place on Dec. 13th, 2015 as originally posted. 
Calling all aspiring neurophysiologists  – HiveBio is offering a unique, brand new workshop with opportunities to earn credit from the American Council on Education (ACE). This all-day workshop is targeted to intraoperative monitoring professionals as full participants for 6.25 hours of approved ACE credits in neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring. Through lectures, brain dissections, and hands-on techniques in brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), attendees will learn the essence of advanced surgical procedures and neurophysiology. Full participants working towards accreditation will receive a tuning fork for clinical examination, sheep brain for dissection, and tubing for BAEP testing. Additional attendees may observe the workshop. All participants will be provided with a small breakfast and lunch, included in the workshop fee.

Come join HiveBio and otolaryngologist, Daniel M Zeitler, MD, (Virginia Mason Hospital) and Kenneth A Klettke, CNIM, Specialty Care as they develop your understanding of auditory systems, neurophysiology, and surgical techniques.

Full participants limited to 8, public observers limited to 4.

Discussion group: Extra-terrestrial life in our solar system?

As Thanksgiving approaches, we might be feeling especially thankful for the rarity of life and our beautiful planet.  But is life on our planet really that unique? Could extant extra-terrestrial life be as close as Europa or Enceladus – or even Mars?

Join us as we discuss the possibility of extraterrestrial life in our Solar System, focusing on Mars and the icy moons Europa and Enceladus. Led by UW Astrobiology grad student Max Showalter, we’ll discuss how to find life in our solar system, where to look, and what it would mean for our lives here on Earth. The hunt for extra-terrestrial life begins at Ada’s Technical Books (425 E 15th Str) Wednesday, Nov 25th at 730 PM.

Cockroach legs and the world of smells: our next upcoming courses

Instead of letting the Seattle rain get on your nerves, turn a rainy day into a great way to learn about how nerves work!

This December 5th, we’ll be offering an exciting, hands-on course about brains, muscles, and nerves that will get you thinking about how your mind interacts with your matter. We’ll look at the science of reflexes by knocking your patellar tendon, see how cockroach legs twitch, and learn about how nerve concentration affects your interpretation of the world. This course, led by UW scientist Kaelan Yu, is perfect for any young or old minds interested in animals, biology, or just how the world works! Learn more by visiting our class page.

Register for “Brains, muscles, and nerves: The neuromuscular system” by clicking here.

In addition to the neuromuscular system, we’ve posted a date for the second running of our very popular course “Memories, molecules, and medicines: An exploration of fragrances & essential oils.” Our upcoming November offering of this course has already sold out, so we’ll be giving another chance to dive into the nose on January 16th, 2016. Learn more on our class page.

Register for the class by clicking here!

New Classes Added!

Hey Seattle! It’s starting to get spooky around town with Halloween spirit, but the scariest thing to us is that you haven’t signed up for our fun Fall Classes yet! Yes, you!

So here’s your halloween reminder – we have a great line up of courses this autumn that’ll get your hands wet with BRAINZ, let you make some slimy, gooey Elephant Toothpaste, and, most frightening of all, pull you away from texted to put your smartphone to useseeing the microscopic world!

We’ve even added a new class that will allow you to explore the world of fragrance – how we sense it, how it’s made, and what it means.

We’re still excited to see you at our upcoming Fall Classes – don’t forget to sign up here!

Stemcell Vampires – HiveBio Discussion group

 

Blood is a morbid fascination of the human mind – a subject of interest from ancient lore of vampires to modern horror movies. But how does biotech reimagine this creepy theme?
Just in time for Halloween, HiveBio discussion group will explore the potential exploitation of human blood – a hypothetical world where vampiric scientists sell the blood of the young to keep the old from withering. We’ll talk about hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs – those that develop into all other blood cells), telomeres, and how science fits into the horror story. So come get spooked with us this Wednesday, Oct 21st at 730 PM as we discuss Stemcell Vampires at Ada’s Technical Books (425 15th Ave E on the Hill).

Check out our new fall classes!

Looking for some science to do as the weather turns cool and gray?

We’ve posted three new classes for November and December to keep your brain engaged as the weather turns sleepy. Dive into the unseen world of microscopy on November 7th, with Smart Phone microscopyor get inside your head by getting inside a brain in our Intro to Neurobiology: Sheep Brain Dissection on November 14th. If you’re looking for an early Christmas Gift, our Elephant Toothpaste class on December 12th will bring out your fun-side as you learn some hands-on chemistry!

So get excited about the changing seasons, because it means more chances to do some science with HiveBio! We can’t wait to see you.

Learn more about these classes and how to register for them here.

HiveBio hits the airwaves

Rock isn’t the only punk thing coming out of Seattle’s airwaves. Biology has gone totally punk, too.

Yesterday, NPR Seattle/Tacoma affiliate KPLU featured HiveBio on their show Sound Effect. Gabriel Spitzer interviewed our CEO and Co-founder Bergen McMurray about HiveBio’s role in citizen science and the community, and what it’s like to run a DIY-Bio lab.

Listen to the feature here: Punk Biology: HiveBio Brings DIY Science Space To Seattle.

Thanks KPLU!